Louis Golino

Modern Numismatics

Louis Golino

Louis Golino has been a collector of American and world coins since childhood and has written about coins since 2009. In addition to writing about modern coins and other numismatic issues for Coin World, he writes a monthly column for The Numismatist magazine and has written for other coin publications. In 2017, for  “Liberty Centennial Designs,” in Elemetal Direct, he was presented with the Numismatic Literary Guild's award for best article in a non-numismatic publication. He is also a founding member of the Modern Coin Forum. 

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A Guide Book of Morgan Silver Dollars (5th edition)

Experienced collectors of the most popular and widely collected classic American coin series, Morgan dollars, know that the Whitman Official Red Book on this topic is the must-have volume. 

There are other good books on the series including the one by Michael Standish, Morgan Dollar: America’s Love Affair with a Legendary Coin, but there is no other reference guide to the series that combines a detailed overview of the history of the series with a year-by-year summary of what was happening in the country each year a Morgan dollar was issued and most importantly, a date and mintmark analysis of each coin.  The latter is especially useful because it provides not just mintages, price info., and certified population data but also what to look for with each coin in terms of strike, eye appeal, etc. for circulating coins, prooflikes, and proof coins.

The recently-released fifth edition of this landmark book is an important event in numismatic publishing.  In addition to updating the text, pricing, and graded coin data, and providing new material on counterfeit error coins, a preface by Whitman editor Dennis Tucker, a foreword by dollar coin expert Adam Crum, and more, the book also contains what can only be described as a numismatic bombshell, the discovery of hubs and master dies for a previously unknown 1964 Morgan dollar and for the 1964 Peace dollar, which was minted but of which there are today no confirmed examples in existence.  The Peace dollar material is covered in a new volume of Roger Burdette’s Red Book on that series that was also published recently.

In 1964 when Congress decided to issue silver dollars again, there was brief though given to issuing a new Morgan dollar, but it was decided to instead produce a 1964 Peace dollar, which was minted in great quantity.  As numismatists know well, all of those coins were supposed to have been destroyed, but from time to time reports surface of 1964 Peace dollars that made it out of the Mint, perhaps by an employee.

But until the new edition of the Bowers Morgan dollar book, no materials related to a 1964 Morgan dollar had ever been found, though they were hinted at in some numismatic research.  But Mr. Bowers, Mr. Tucker, and several other numismatic researchers went to the Philly Mint in July 2015 while researching the modern minting process, where they discovered models, hubs, and master dies for a 1964 Morgan dollar plus other materials relating to the 1963 and 1964 experiments to revive silver dollars.  No trial strikes or actual coins were found.  As Bowers says in the book, the 1964 Morgan is now “one of those coins that might have been, but never were.”

 

 

  

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Older Comments (3)
I collect GSA CC coins graded by NGC. My collection ranges from MS 62 - 67. My long term goal is to eventually own the highest grades I can afford. Only one is a PL and a few are the Vam's that appear in Adam Crum's Carson City Morgan Dollars book such as the Vam 11 & 18. I consider that book a standard of sorts mostly because his book clearly assembles all of the 1878-1893 NGC graded coins. My problem is this, I cannot find one single price guide that covers my GSA CC coins graded by NGC. Most buyers want to offer the CDN Greysheet and those prices do not cover NGC graded MS 60 - 67 coins.
Doug

Doug- Thanks for your comment and good luck with your collection. Perhaps Mr Crum will include the NGC data in the next edition of his book, or maybe Mr. Bowers will do so.