US Coins

Market Analysis: Erroneously struck on cent planchets

A 1920 Indian Head 5-cent coin struck on a cent planchet sold for $2,640, and a 1976-D Bicentennial quarter dollar struck on a cent planchet brought $2,400 at the Dec. 15, 2020, Heritage Auctions online session.

All images courtesy of Heritage Auctions.

Coins accidentally struck on cent planchets are especially popular because the difference in color makes them obvious.

For example, a 1976-D Washington, Bicentennial quarter dollar struck on a cent planchet differs from a regular issue quarter both in its smaller size and, more obviously, the bronze color.

Of an example in its Dec. 15 auction of error coins, Heritage wrote, “The strike is off center 7 o’clock relative to the obverse, where a full rim is formed,” adding, “Most of the dual dates are visible, as is UNITED STATES.”

Graded About Uncirculated 58 by Professional Coin Grading Service, it’s tantalizing to think that this circulated briefly.

The cataloger noted, “Lightly toned in sea-green, gold, and lilac hues with trivial signs of high-point friction that limit the grade.” It realized $2,400.

Selling for just a bit more at $2,640 was a 1920 Indian Head 5-cent coin struck on a planchet intended for a cent and graded Extremely Fine Details, Damage or Tooling by PCGS, with Heritage adding, “Scratches along the lower right obverse border are the most obvious evidence of damage on this piece.”

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