US Coins

Kentucky dollar celebrates state’s musical heritage

The U.S. Mint launches sales on June 28 of 100-coin canvas bags and 25-coin paper-wrapped rolls of circulation-finish 2022-P and 2022-D American Innovation, Kentucky dollars.

Images courtesy of the United States Mint.

The U.S. Mint launches sales on June 28 of 100-coin canvas bags and 25-coin paper-wrapped rolls of circulation-finish 2022-P and 2022-D American Innovation, Kentucky dollars.

The bags holding either Denver Mint or Philadelphia Mint coins struck with circulation-quality finish will be offered at $117.50 per bag. The 25-coin rolls will be offered for $34.50 per roll.

The reverse of the Kentucky dollar reverse pays homage to the home of bluegrass music.

The design features a banjo, an important bluegrass instrument, tilted to one side, alluding to the rhythm and movement of the music.

The reverse design is the work of U.S. Mint Artistic Infusion Program artist Christina Hess and sculpted by U.S. Mint Medallic Artist Renata Gordon

The 2022 American Innovation, Kentucky dollar is the third of four Innovation dollars to be released in calendar year 2022 and the 15th overall in the scheduled 57-coin series.

One coin is being issued recognizing achievement and innovation in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and the five U.S. territories — Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, U.S. Virgin Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

An introductory coin for the series was released in 2018. Its reverse depicts a bar inscribed UNITED STATES OF AMERICA crossing the field diagonally, with a series of stylized gears from machinery in the uppermost field. The lower field exhibits a facsimile of President George Washington’s signature as it appears on the first U.S. patent from 1790. The signature is a legislated element. Above the signature in two lines appears AMERICAN / INNOVATORS with a privy mark depicting an eagle with shield among agricultural and industrial tools.

The first U.S. patent, No. X000001, was issued in New York City by U.S. Attorney General Edmund Jennings Randolph on July 31, 1790, to Samuel Hopkins for “the improvement of pot ash and pearl ash.” Hopkins was an American Congregationalist theologian of the late Colonial era of the United States and one of the first public opponents of the institution of slavery.

None of the circulation-quality coins is being released into general circulation. The last dollar coins issued for circulation were 2011 James A. Garfield, Presidential dollars. In December 2011, then Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner imposed a moratorium on the production of dollar coins for circulation, reserving such production for numismatic sales only.

The American Innovation dollars series’ common obverse depicts the Statue of Liberty.

The obverse design was created and sculpted by now-retired U.S. Mint lead Sculptor-Engraver Donald Everhart II.

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