US Coins

High prices for 2021 dollars in secondary market

Secondary market prices realized for the six Matte Finish 2021 silver dollars are reaching three times or more above the U.S. Mint’s $85 retail issue price for the coins.

The U.S. Mint offered up to 175,000 2021 Morgan dollars each struck at the Denver, San Francisco and Philadelphia Mints and a maximum of 200,000 2021 Peace dollars struck at the Philadelphia Mint.

The Denver Mint coins bear the facility’s D Mint mark, and the San Francisco strikes the S Mint mark. The Morgan and Peace dollars representing Philadelphia Mint output carry no Mint mark. The Philadelphia Mint strikes of the 1921 coins these 2021 dollars emulate also did not carry Mint marks.

The Philadelphia Mint also struck Morgan dollars bearing CC and O privy marks to recognize the contributions to the Morgan dollar’s production history at the Carson City Mint in Nevada and New Orleans Mint in Louisiana.

Flooding eBay

The U.S. Mint began shipping orders of the coins on Oct. 18. Soon after receipt of their coins, collectors, dealers and speculators began flooding the online auction platform eBay with offerings of single coins, three coins of any one date and Mint mark, 10 coins from any single Mint or a six-coin offering of one or each of the six coins originally sold by the U.S. Mint.

Many of the eBay offerings were listed as presales, an indication the seller did not have the coins in hand as yet, but had Mint confirmation that an order was being processed. Completed eBay sales were either by auction format or a Buy It Now option at the specified price.

Many of the completed sales closed Oct. 25 and Oct. 26. All of the coins offered were advertised for sale in their original Mint packaging, with none of the completed sales having been coins graded by an independent, third-party professional grading service.

It is likely secondary market prices will rise with the offering of certified examples.

Completed eBay sales Oct. 26 include $249.95 for a single 2021-CC Morgan dollar; $199 for a single 2021-O Morgan dollar; and $825 for a six-coin lot of three 2021-D Morgan dollars and three 2021-S Morgan dollars.

Other completed sales Oct. 26 include a lot of 10 2021-CC Morgan dollars for $2,099.99; another 10-coin lot of 2021-CC Morgan dollars for $2,050; and a 10-coin lot of 2021-O Morgan dollars for $1,799.99.

An Oct. 26 completed sale for a 2021 Peace dollar realized $211.50.

Completed sales Oct. 25 for the 2021 Peace dollar included $185 for a single coin and two three-coin lots, one closing at $514.99 and another at $507.

Grading submissions

Professional Coin Grading Service, Numismatic Guaranty Company, ANACS and Independent Coin Graders confirmed to Coin World Oct. 26 they had received varying numbers of submissions for the respective 2021 releases, but NGC was the only service that had any of those totals reported  online in the grading service’s census or population reports.

NGC reports grading and encapsulating 565 of the 2021-D Morgan dollars, with all but one example grading Mint State 70 and  a lone example graded MS-69.

NGC also posted 555 examples of the 2021 Morgan dollar with O privy mark, with 554 MS-70 coins and one MS-69 coin.

Revised sales

Unaudited sales figures of the six 2021 silver dollars were revised in the U.S. Mint’s Oct. 24 sales report, with some totals recorded down from the number published in the Oct. 17 report.

The Oct. 24 sales totals appearing first, followed by sales totals from the Oct, 17 report, indicates the following:
➤ 2021-S Morgan dollar, 173,887 (174,120).
➤ 2021-D Morgan dollar, 173,829 (174,071).
➤ 2021 Morgan dollar, 174,594 (171,823).
➤ 2021-CC Morgan dollar, 170,306 (170,516).
➤ 2021-O Morgan dollar, 170,612 (170,834).
➤ 2021 Peace dollar, 195,946 (196,198).

Collectors have been reporting deliveries of their coins, with the recipients offering varying opinions on the appearances and quality of the coins received.

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