This Norse American Centennial medal is thin, has eight sides, and is popular

Market Analysis: FUN hosts successful 11th annual summer convention in sunny Orlando
By , Coin World
Published : 08/03/17
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Heritage’s July 6 to 9 auctions held in conjunction with the summer Florida United Numismatists convention realized nearly $6 million, with a 99 percent sell-through rate. While a Seated Liberty 20-cent coin topped bidding, many collectors were attracted to an 1893-S Morgan dollar graded About Uncirculated 55 by PCGS, and it sold for $38,796, right in line with what comparably graded examples have traded hands for in recent sales. Here are three pieces — two of them coins and one a medal — that illustrate the variety of material offered in the auction.

Here’s one of three lots we're profiling from Heritage's Summer FUN sale:

The Lot:

1925 Norse American Centennial silver medal, thin planchet, MS-66, green CAC sticker

The Price:


The Story:

The 1925 Norse American Centennial medal is not a commemorative coin, but it has long been collected alongside the 1892 to 1954 classic era commemorative half dollars. The Philadelphia Mint struck 33,750 Norse silver medals on thick planchets and just 6,000 on thin planchets, along with 100 gold examples. 

The peak of Olympic gold coins: Another column in the August 14 weekly issue of Coin World also profiles a rubber token that promotes a commonplace object we all use.

It is a fun issue for collectors, since it falls right in the middle of the classic commemorative series and its octagonal shape and Viking theme makes it an unusual treat. This example is one of the best and exhibits rich gold, lavender-gray and deeper blue shades on both sides. Among the finest known, with PCGS grading no thin planchet examples MS-67, it sold for $9,106.25.

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The medal celebrates the centennial of the arrival of the Norwegian ship Restauration in America, and while the champions of the issue in the 1920s hoped for a commemorative half dollar, they had to settle for a commemorative medal. The unusual octagonal shape makes it memorable today and keeps its popularity alive.


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