US Coins

Monday Morning Brief: Share your thoughts with us

A lively and ongoing discussion can be useful, educational and entertaining in exploring events and trends in the hobby, whether it is about a new coin design or a change in Mint policy.

Images courtesy of the U.S. Mint.

When I began my career at Coin World in the fall of 1976, our Letters to the Editor page was the only place where readers could comment on the hobby and our coverage of it. 

That has changed.

Today, while we continue to offer you opportunities to comment and share opinions on the Letters page opposite this one and through the Guest Commentary below, we also offer you other venues to do the same: through postings of our articles at our Facebook page and through Disqus at our main website.

A lively and ongoing discussion can be useful, educational and entertaining in exploring events and trends in the hobby, whether it is about a new design or a change in Mint policy. 

The introduction of new technologies has certainly changed the dynamics of reader participation in hobby discussions. The number of traditional Letters to the Editor has fallen sharply over the years; the shrinking base of collectors probably has played a role, but so has the ability to comment more directly, through Facebook and Disqus. 


2018 Lincoln, Doubled Die Obverse centInside Coin World: Finally, a doubled die on a 2018 Lincoln cent: In the Dec. 17 issue, Coin World’s contributors share the first doubled die on a 2018 Lincoln cent, examine 1929 Indian Head gold coins and advise looking at your coins closely.


Our Letters to the Editor page these days may feature commentary sent through the Postal Service — very few — or as an email, but we also now publish Disqus and Facebook comments as part of the traditional Letters page.

As has always been the case, comments are moderated at all venues. We will reject traditional letters we feel are unsuitable or inappropriate, and we moderate discussions at Facebook and through Disqus. Facebook comments are published immediately, of course, but we will “hide” a comment that we believe to be inappropriate (that does not happen often, though some stories attract larger numbers of inappropriate comments). Disqus comments require an editor’s approval before they are published.

In your commentary, we ask that you be civil, that you avoid bad language (no cursing, please) and libelous comments. Overt political commentary is discouraged, though what constitutes political commentary is often debatable and is sometimes unavoidable. Some comments will get the writer an immediate ban at Facebook and Disqus. Remember that satire rarely comes off well, and frivolous comments sent via Disqus are rarely approved. We welcome your commentary as long as you are mindful of these guidelines. 

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