Rare Norwegian note is not a specimen issue, which makes it unusual

Note issued between 1877 and 1891 is part of the first series of Norwegian kroner currency
By , Special to Coin World
Published : 11/13/17
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Oslo Myntgalleri’s auction on Nov. 25 in Oslo will feature probably the only 50-krone note from King Oscar II that is not a specimen note available on the market today.

The note is part of the first series of Norwegian currency, introduced when new bank notes were necessary after the kroner and øre replaced the speciedaler and skilling in 1875. 

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According to the Bank of Norway, in total, 40,900,000 examples of this note were issued between 1877 and 1891. It was valid until July 13, 1998. The first series was the only one to have the monarch’s portrait on the face. 


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The back has a stylized Viking king at the left and the crowned royal arms at the right. It is hand-signed Blom/Kamstrup and hand-dated 1880.

The piece being auctioned is graded “1” in the Scandinavian system, corresponding to Fine condition, and is estimated at 350,000 kroner or about $43,000.

The note was printed in green ink on white paper with copper plate and multicolor letterpress techniques. 

The Bank of Norway says that until 1891 the faces were printed in London and the backs at the bank’s facility in Trondheim.

The entire auction is here.

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