Bank of China (Hong Kong) Limited celebrates centennial of service

To issue a $100 commemorative bank note, though release limited to those with Hong Kong identity card
By , Special to Coin World
Published : 10/09/17
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The Bank of China (Hong Kong) Limited said on Sept. 25 that it will issue a $100 commemorative bank note to celebrate the 100th anniversary of its “service to Hong Kong.”

It will be available for subscription online or at bank branches to those age 18 or older with a valid Hong Kong identity card. The bank says net proceeds generated from the sale will be used for local community projects and charitable causes.


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A total of 5 million commemorative bank notes will be issued in 3.24 million sets (each note is equivalent to $12.80 in U.S. funds). The note will be offered in three different packages. One is a single note (2.9 million sets) priced at $288 (all prices are in Hong Kong funds). The balance are 300,000 sets of uncut sheets of three for $988, and 40,000 uncut sheets of 30 notes at $13,888.

The face side features a famous local landmark, the Bank of China Tower, along with an image of the Bank of China Building, with the old Bank of China Hong Kong Branch and Bank of China Head Office in Beijing on the side. Also shown are the Great Wall of China and an ancient building pillar that the bank claims represents its strength. 

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The back shows the first Hong Kong dollar-denominated bank note issued by the bank in 1994, depicting both sides of Victoria Harbor as seen from Victoria Peak. Superimposed with it is the current skyline of Victoria Harbor and a modern container terminal 

The note is legal tender in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, but is not intended for circulation. Security devices include a color-changing pattern (an old coin), enhanced watermark (the Great Wall) and color-changing windowed metallic thread.

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