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Louis Golino

Modern Numismatics

Louis Golino

Louis Golino has been a collector of American and world coins since childhood and has written about coins since 2009. In addition to writing about modern coins and other numismatic issues for Coin World, he also has written a regular column for CoinWeek.com since 2011, writes a monthy column for The Numismatist magazine and has written for other coin publications. In 2015, for his CoinWeek column “The Coin Analyst,” he was presented with the Numismatic Literary Guild's award for best online column. He is also a founding member of the Modern Coin Forum. 

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Archive for 'October 2016'

    World Bullion Coins in 2017

    October 21, 2016 10:14 AM by Louis Golino

    2017 is already shaping up as an exciting year for modern bullion coins.

    From the new Pegasus series to the first-ever silver Krugerand and a modification to the design of the Britannia silver bullion coin, among other developments, there is a lot happening in the coming months.

    First, the Pegasus silver coin, a well-designed reverse proof silver coin from Pobjoy on behalf of the British Virgin Islands.  In seems like a replacement for the Angel series the mint produced for Isle of Man for the past couple decades, which ended with the 2016 silver and gold coins since Isle of Man cancelled its longstanding contract with the mint.

    The design shows two figures from Greek mythology, the white-winged Pegasus horse with the Greek goddess Athena next to it, and the mintage is just 50,000 coins, a small number for a bullion issue.  Considering it is the first year of the new series, a low-mintage reverse proof, and that is can be purchased for just a couple of dollars over melt, I think these coins are a smart buy.

    On the occasion of the Krugerand gold coin’s 50th anniversary, the South African Mint is introducing a long-awaited silver version that sports the same iconic image of a springbok and has a “50” in a circle privy mark.  The plan is to issue a half million “premium uncirculated” finish coins plus 15,000 proofs, and to make the silver coin an ongoing series.

    The mint also plans to issue a platinum proof for the first time plus new sizes of gold coins to supplement the existing 1 oz., ½ oz., ¼ oz., and 1/10th oz., including 1/50th oz., 1/20th oz., 5 oz., and a whopping 50 oz.

    Then there is the Royal Mint, which is adding cool-looking radiating lines to the background of the popular silver Britannia, and this design modification is an anti-counterfeiting measure like the similar lines the RCM added to its Maple Leaf coins a couple years ago.  

    Initial reports suggested the change might only be on the lunar privy mark version of the 2017 Britannia, but APMEX has posted an image of the new design on its site (www.apmex.com).

    Plus the second 2-oz. silver coin in the very well received Queen’s Beast series is coming soon.  The new coin will depict a griffin.  There are also reports (unconfirmed but appear to be from a reputable source) that the ¼ oz. gold version will no longer be made, so the lion coin of that size will be a one-year type.  The 1 oz. gold coins are expected to continue.

    The RM also recently launched its 2017 Year of the Rooster silver and gold coins.  These are bullion pieces, and there is also a plethora of commemorative rooster coins, many of which are already or will soon be released.  Some more notable ones are those from the Perth Mint, which so far include the bullion, proofs, and color proof, and the Niue 5-oz. silver selectively gilded coin and Cook Islands 5-oz. silver with large red mother of pearl inlay.  Both are higher-end coins that are not cheap.


    Photo credit: Modern Coin Mart (www.moderncoinmart.com)


    Second Reverse Proof Libertad Released

    October 14, 2016 11:04 AM by Louis Golino

    Readers of this column and my articles in the magazine know that the Mexican Libertad series, especially the various silver coins, is one of my favorite modern world issues.

    This is a series that has so much going for it from one of the very best designs ever to appear on a modern coin to coins issued in a wide range of sizes in both business strike and proof and of course, the amazingly low mintages of many of the coins.

    In recent years a number of special sets and other innovations have also been added to this impressive mix.

    For example, the 7-coin proof set that began in 2014 and includes each size of silver proof Libertad packaged in a convenient, slim wooden box remains popular and continues to sellout quickly.  Those sets come with a numbered certificate of authenticity, which is important to Libertad collectors.

    Last year the first reverse proof coin was introduced and had a total mintage of 1500 pieces, which were sold in two sets.  One was produced for APMEX (www.apmex.com) and limited to 500 sets and included the reverse proof and regular proof, while the second was made for employees of the Banco de Mexico and also included the regular BU coin.  Those sets were limited to 1000 units, and many of them made their way into the U.S. and other foreign markets via eBay and dealers.

    At the beginning of October, the 2016 reverse proof was released starting with the same type of two-coin set for APMEX, but this time there are 1000 of those.  Sold initially for $250 per set, they are now going for about $20-30 more.  The Coin Shoppe in Canada (www.thecoinshoppe.ca) is selling them for $268.99. 

    Though I expect them to eventually reach a higher price point, that is a less substantial increase than last year’s sets saw, especially during the initial period after their release.

    I have heard that a second Banco set, possibly the same three-coin set issued last year, is coming soon, perhaps in the next couple of weeks.  But the number of sets is not known at the present time.

    Assuming the sets from the Banco are again limited to 1500, the total mintage would be 2000 for the 2016 issue.  That is still a very low number and would make it another low mintage key to the series.

    I have seen the 2016 coin, and it looks great.  It will be interesting to see if the Mexican mint continues to issue a reverse proof each year, or does something different next year.  Given its track record of changing things up regularly, almost anything is possible. 



    Will Teddy Roosevelt Coins Sell Out?

    October 6, 2016 12:30 PM by Louis Golino
    Today the U.S. Mint is releasing what is surely the most eagerly anticipated coin of the America the Beautiful 5-ounce silver series of coins with a “P” mintmark that are aimed at collectors and feature a matte finish.

    The coin, which is the 34th of the “P”-series, is the Theodore Roosevelt National Park issue that features a gorgeous design by Joel Iskowitz that depicts President Roosevelt riding a horse as he surveys the terrain near Little Missouri River.

    There is also a bullion version of the coin that is already available from bullion and coin dealers around the country.  That coin went on sale to the Mint’s network of Authorized Purchasers on Aug. 29, and as of last Friday, October 2, 30,500 of the coins have been sold.

    The P version has an authorized maximum mintage of 30,000 units, while the overall maximum for both versions is set at 150,000 coins.  In theory that means the bullion coin has a maximum of 120,000 coins, but of fewer than 30,000 of the collector version are sold, the mint can make more than 120,000 bullion coins if there is sufficient demand.

    Most sales of both coins tend to occur early on soon after they first become available. 

    Sales of the bullion coin do seem to be unusually low given the huge popularity of President Roosevelt with coin collectors because of his critical role in creating the nation’s most beloved gold coins, especially the Saint Gaudens $20 gold double eagle, which was part of the renaissance in American coinage that he launched in collaboration with Saint Gaudens.

    In addition, the design of the coin has been very well received by collectors.

    With spot silver prices having dropped dramatically this week to under $17.50 an ounce, the bullion coin can be purchased at the moment for around $110 or less.  I suspect that we will see stronger sales for this version in the coming weeks if silver stays at about these levels.

    As for the “P” puck, as collectors often refer to the version sold directly by the Mint to consumers, I expect it to be a strong seller, but whether or not it achieves an actual sellout remains unclear.

    Some collectors predicted very strong initial sales, and to avoid disappointment they purchased the coin through the Mint’s enrollment program.  I confess to being one of these nervous nellies, who did not want to take any chances.

    And keep in mind that a sellout is not a guarantee that the P version will sell for an especially high premium.  A very quick or instant sellout usually has that effect, but it is often only temporary until those coins reach the secondary market, depending on how many dealers bought for resale and how many went to collectors to keep.

    No matter what happens in terms of current sales, this issue in both versions will undoubtedly be one of the most popular of the series over the long term, which should help it to garner a premium over other releases.

    But I doubt they will emerge as series keys, which are typically the lowest mintage coins.  That honor seems set to remain with the 2012 coins.