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Louis Golino

Modern Numismatics

Louis Golino

Louis Golino has been a collector of American and world coins since childhood and has written about coins since 2009. In addition to writing about modern coins and other numismatic issues for Coin World, he also has written a regular column for CoinWeek.com since 2011, writes a monthy column for The Numismatist magazine and has written for other coin publications. In 2015, for his CoinWeek column “The Coin Analyst,” he was presented with the Numismatic Literary Guild's award for best online column. He is also a founding member of the Modern Coin Forum. 

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Archive for 'April 2016'

    Two More New Issues from the Mint of Poland

    April 29, 2016 2:41 PM by Louis Golino
    Spring is often when world mints roll out some of their best products of the year.  Already we have seen Coin Invest Trust begin to release an impressive range of coins for virtually every taste from the Great Tea Race coins to the new Tiffany issue and many others that were first unveiled during the February World Money Fair in Berlin.
    Now the Mint of Poland, one of the premier coining facilities in the world that specializes in producing top-quality issues for other countries, is doing the same.
    In addition to the intriguing planet Mercury coin I discussed last week, two other interesting high-end pieces were announced this week.
    The first is a 2-oz. high relief, antique silver coin issued for Niue about the famous Trojan Horse that the ancient Greeks used to secretly invade the city of Troy.  
    According to a Latin poem from the time of Augustus and of course in Homer's Iliad, the Greeks made a large wooden horse and hid some of their armed force inside it.  They then pretended they were sailing away after a decade-long siege but pulled the horse into the city and under the cover of night, the men in the horse came out and attacked the Trojans.  
    The coin features exquisite artwork and a real wooden inlay, and it is rimless with the serial number etched on the coin, and the number matches that which is on the certificate of authenticity.  It is also the first issue in a new series called Ancient Myths.  A mere 500 coins were issued, and the coin is sellout of fast pushing retail prices from $200 to about $260 over the course of the week.
    The other new issue is also a first in a new series called Evolution of Earth and features a bug called a Trilobite.  The coin is also made of 2-oz. of silver and is struck in ultra high relief with a relief of 3.7 millimeters, a mintage of 666 coins, and is plated with two rare metals- gold and ruthenium.  Trilobites were one of the first arthropods (an invertebrate animal with an exoskeleton) to roam the earth and managed to live for 270 million years.  These coins can be obtained from sellers who typically carry Mint of Poland releases such as the Coin Shoppe (www.thecoinshoppe.ca), First Coin Company (www.firstcoincompany.com), Powercoin (www.powercoin.it) and on eBay.  The Coin Shoppe has already sold out of the Trojan Horse coin twice.  

    A Different Mercury Coin

    April 21, 2016 11:06 AM by Louis Golino

    With all the focus on the release today of the 2016-W gold Mercury dime, properly called Winged Liberty or Liberty Head dime as numismatists know, collectors may not be aware that a different Mercury coin is also going to be released soon.

    It is the second release in the Mint of Poland’s solar system series, which debuted last year with the issuance of the popular 2015 moon coin.  These pieces are issued under the legal authority of Niue, and the 2016 coin features the planet Mercury, which is the smallest planet and the one closest to the sun.

    Like the moon coin the new issue, which is expected to be available in May, will be dome shaped and comes with an antique finish, but for the Mercury issue it will be a yellow-colored antique finish to resemble the color of the planet. 

    In addition, the Mercury coin is embedded with a small piece of a real meteorite like the moon issue was.  In this case it is the NWA8409 meteorite found in Northwest Africa, specifically in Morocco in 2013.  This particular meteorite is worth $3,000 for one gram, and the fragment on the coin is worth about $70.

    The reverse of the coin is convex-shaped and depicts the surface of the planet and has the meteorite fragment, while the obverse is concave and has a rather small effigy of Queen Elizabeth II like all Commonwealth coins as well as lots of surface details of the planet. 

    The mintage is just 666 pieces, and the coin comes in a wooden display box with a certificate of authenticity. 

    Coins depicting planets, meteorites, and other subjects related to astronomy and space have become very popular in recent years, as I explained in my article in the September issue of Coin World magazine (http://www.coinworld.com/news/world-coins/2015/09/space-themed-world-coins-more-popular-than-ever.html).

    While there is never any guarantee, these coins also have a rather solid track record with the best example being a 2009 Cook Islands moon coin that is now worth 10 times its issue price. 

    The Mercury coin is available from sellers such as the Coin Shoppe (www.thecoinshoppe.ca), a Canadian company that ships frequently to the U.S. via Niagara Falls, and on eBay.  The coin is priced at about $200 at the Coin Shoppe, while recent eBay sales have been about 10% higher at $220 and $230.  Don’t be surprised if the coin reaches higher prices in the coming weeks. 

    The next coins in this series will depict Mars in 2017 and the Earth in 2018.  With one coin a year and an impressive level of detail on these coins as well as their shape, low mintage, and rare meteorite fragments, the solar system series is shaping up to be a winner as well as an interesting and coherent set of coins. 


    Irish Central Bank Issues Coins to Mark Centennial of Easter Rising

    April 14, 2016 3:11 PM by Louis Golino
    On April 4 th the Central Bank of Ireland issued gold and silver proof coins to mark the 100 th anniversary of the Easter Rising, also known as the Easter Rebellion.

    That event, which played a key role in the establishment of the Irish republic, was an armed insurrection by Irish Republicans on Easter weekend in April 1916 to protest British rule of Ireland.  The protesters were killed by British soldiers.

    During the uprising, one of the activists, stood on the Central Post Office’s steps and read this proclamation: “We declare the right of the people of Ireland to the ownership of Ireland, and to the unfettered control of Irish destinies, to be sovereign and indefeasible. The long usurpation of that right by a foreign people and government has not extinguished the right, nor can it ever be extinguished except by the destruction of the Irish people.”

    In addition to a 2-euro bimetallic coin already covered in Coin World, a 15-euro silver proof and two gold coins, one of them with a 50-euro denomination and the other 100 euro, were also issued.  The silver coin is sold individually and in a two-coin set with the smaller gold coin, which weighs 7.77 grams.  The larger gold coin weighs twice as much and was released as a stand-alone piece. 

    Both the set and 100-euro gold sold out almost instantly, but the single silver coin is still available from the bank, and in the U.S. from Royal Scandinavian Mint (www.rsmint.com), which offers buyers the option to obtain a certificate of authenticity signed by the designer of the coin, Michael Guilfoyle.  Their price is $67.50.

    The coins feature a gorgeous design showing Hibernia, the allegorical representation of Ireland (similar to Lady Liberty here, or Britannia in the UK), which first appeared in cartoons and drawings in the 19th century.  Hibernia was also known as “Britannia’s younger sister.” On the coin she appears in front of key phrases from the proclamation.

    The coins were minted by the Austrian Mint in Vienna, and carry mintages of 18,000 for the silver, 5500 for the 50-euro gold, and 1,000 for the 100-euro gold.



    Act Now to Make Apollo 11 Coins a Reality

    April 6, 2016 10:27 AM by Louis Golino

    Last year Rep. Bill Posey (R- FL) introduced a bill, H.R. 2726, calling for the issuance in 2019 of a series of four coins honoring the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing on the moon, one of the greatest achievements of our country and of mankind.  The coins include the usual three-coin set of a silver dollar, clad half dollar, and $5 gold coin plus a first for the modern commemorative program, a proof 5-ounce silver coin struck in the concave/convex shape used for the 2014 Baseball Hall of Fame coins.

    Last June Steve Roach explained in Coin World what this proposed coin program would include.

    This program was first recommended in 2014 during a meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee, when Mike Olson made a motion for it that received a unanimous vote, and the proposal again received a unanimous vote in 2015.

    Since his term on the CCAC ended in 2014, Mr. Olson, an Iowa banker and former Army National Guard Lt. Colonel, has been working to promote this program, including meeting with members of congress from states that participated in the massive effort to land on the moon such as Florida, Texas, California, and Alabama.  He was last on Capitol Hill a couple weeks ago.

    Connect with Coin World:  

    There is a lot of interest in these coins because of the huge significance of the event and the fact that it has never been commemorated on a U.S. coin, yet many world mints have already issued such coins. 

    To date H.R. 2726 has 63 co-sponsors, but it needs 290 to move the legislation forward.  So far most of those who have signed onto the bill come from the same states mentioned above.  In addition, a companion Senate bill has not yet been introduced.

    If the bill does not pass both houses by the end of the year, it will expire, and those who care about this program will have to start all over again.

    That is why time is really of the essence and why any collectors that want to see these coins issued should do what Mr. Olson recommended:

    Here is what coin collectors can do to make a difference and win the support of their members of Congress.  First, go to this link and see if your representative has cosponsored H.R. 2726.

    If their representative is not listed as a cosponsor, collectors should research contributions that companies or universities in their congressional district made or continue to make to the space program.   Almost every state had some involvement in the Apollo program, which was by design to ensure widespread support for this massive fiscal and human undertaking. With involvement now by the coin collecting community, this can also serve to generate pivotal support for H.R. 2726.  For example, Rockwell Collins, an Iowa company, played a key role by producing the radios that communicated between the earth and moon.

    The next step is to contact their representative's office in Washington DC via phone or email. You can find your representative’s contact information here. I suggest calling the Washington DC office of your representative and asking to speak to the legislative director. If they are unavailable, leave a message and ask for their email address in order to also send them some information, making sure to specifically reference H.R. 2726. Let them know about the key role that constituents in their district made to the space program, the enthusiasm in the numismatic community regarding this particular set of coins, and the fact that over 60 of their colleagues have cosponsored this legislation already. It would also be important to mention the worthy organizations which would receive surcharges from the sale of these coins: the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum's "Destination Moon" exhibit; the Astronauts Memorial Foundation; and the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, to aid its missions by providing college scholarships for the very best and brightest students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM). 

    Dieter Jobe with Congressman Posey's office can also be contacted for those with questions on how they can support this legislation.  His contact information is:  Dieter.Jobe@mail.house.gov; (202)-225-3603.

    In addition to contacting their Congressman, collectors should also contact both of their Senators, who can be found by following this link

    There is currently not a bill in the Senate, however I am very hopeful and optimistic that a bill will emerge and making these contacts now will serve to generate  interest and support that will be needed later.

    If collectors want to see this happen, they need to act NOW, and get their friends and neighbors engaged.  It is very time intensive to get a commemorative coin proposal to this point and if this does not get passed by both houses before the end of the session this year, we will have to start over.  We only have one chance in our lifetimes to honor the Apollo 11 lunar landing on a significant anniversary and we owe it to the astronauts and the people who made it possible to complete this mission.