U.S. Mint tackling stellar set of commemorative coins: Monday Morning Brief, Jan. 2

By , Coin World
Published : 01/02/17
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President Obama signed into law Dec. 16 the Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Act, a four-coin program that authorizes production of a gold $5 half eagle, a standard 38.1-millimeter silver dollar, a copper-nickel-clad half dollar, and a 3-inch, 5-ounce silver dollar.

Full Video Transcript:


This is the Monday Morning Brief for January 2, 2017. I’m Coin World Senior Editor Paul Gilkes.

President Obama signed into legislation December 16 the Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Act, a four-coin program which authorizes production of a gold $5 half eagle, standard 38.1-millimeter silver dollar, a copper-nickel-clad half dollar, and a 3-inch, 5-ounce silver dollar.

The 2019 program is the first U.S. commemorative coin program to offer two silver dollars of different specifications.

The Apollo 11 commemorative coin program will emulate the 2014 National Baseball Hall of Fame program in that all four 2019 coins will be concave on the obverse and convex on the reverse.

A juried competition will be held to determine the individual obverse designs for the four Apollo 11 coins. However, the enabling act mandates a common reverse design.

The common reverse shall be representative of a close-up of the famous “Buzz Aldrin on the Moon” photograph taken July 20, 1969, that shows the visor and part of the helmet of Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, in which the visor has a mirrored finish and reflects the image of the United States flag and the lunar lander and the remainder of the helmet will have a frosted finish.

Aldrin was among the proponents of an Apollo 11 commemorative coin series.

The U.S. Mint’s technical staff at the Philadelphia Mint where experimentation and testing will be conducted has been presented some production challenges.

The legislation mandates to the extent possible without adding to the purchase price of each of the four coins, the coins are to be produced with the design of the reverse of the coins continuing over what would otherwise be the edge of the coins, such that the reverse designs extend all the way to the obverse design.

If the Mint’s technical staff can meet the congressional challenge, collectors will be the beneficiaries of a stellar set of U.S. commemorative coins.

For Coin World, I’m Paul Gilkes.

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1 comment
The commemorative coin program is getting ridiculous .....different shapes and now designs on the edge....where does this nonsense stop?