Isle of Man Christmas coins, cards now available

Annual product for 2014 celebrates Snowman and Snowdog
By , Coin World
Published : 11/10/14
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A British animated short film, The Snowman and The Snowdog, is the subject of the 2014 edition of the Pobjoy Mint’s annual Christmas coins.

The coins, from the Isle of Man, commemorate the 2012 sequel to 1982 animated film  The Snowman.

Every year since 1980, the Isle of Man has issued a Christmas-themed 50-penny coin. New to the program for 2014 is the addition of a crown coin, with a different scene than used on the 50-penny coins in this year's offering.

The two denominations are available in different finishes, with several colorful versions part of the 2014 program.

The Snowman and The Snowdog is “a heart-warming story about love, loss and friendship,” according to the Pobjoy Mint. “When a young boy, Billy, moves house, he discovers a secret box hidden under the floorboards. In it are a hat, scarf, some lumps of coal and a shrivelled tangerine — a snowman-making kit.”

Later that day it snows and Billy builds a snowman and, with a little spare snow, a snowdog. That night, at midnight, the characters the Snowman and the Snowdog magically come to life. The boy awakes and joins them on an amazing adventure.

Originally published in 1978, The Snowman, created and illustrated by Raymond Briggs has become one of the world’s most popular children’s books. It was adapted for the screen in 1982 and is shown every year on television in the United Kingdom.

The sequel, The Snowman and The Snowdog, premiered on Christmas Eve 2012 to an audience of more than 10 million viewers.

The reverse of the 50-penny coins shows the three main characters — Billy and the two snow creatures — as if posing for a photograph with Christmas trees in the background. The reverse of the crown coin shows all three characters soaring above rooftops.

The obverse of the coins shows the Ian Rank-Broadley effigy of Queen Elizabeth II. 

The 50-penny coin is available in Diamond Finish copper-nickel, Proof .925 fine silver and Proof .916 fine gold versions. 

The crown coin is available in copper-nickel and Proof .925 fine silver versions.

Copper-nickel and silver versions of both denominations are available with or without color. All four versions are available in Christmas cards showing a scene from the story or in standard packaging. 

All of the coins were approved by Buckingham Palace, according to the Pobjoy Mint.

All composition versions of the 50-penny coin weigh 8 grams and measure 27.3 millimeters in diameter.

The copper-nickel 50-penny coin has a mintage limit of 30,000, regardless of packaging and color option. 

The Proof silver 50-penny coin has a mintage limit of 5,000 pieces across all options. 

The Proof gold 50-penny coin has a mintage limit of 250 pieces.

The crown coins both weigh 28.28 grams and measure 38.6 millimeters. The copper-nickel version has unlimited mintage and the silver version is limited to 10,000 pieces, across all options.

The copper-nickel 50-penny and crown coins cost $21.95 each in cards, with colorful versions in cards priced at $23.95 each.

The silver 50-pence and crown coins cost $89 each, whether delivered in a box or Christmas card, with colorful versions (in either packaging option) costing $99 each.

The price of the gold 50-penny coin was not immediately available.

For more information or to order the coins, visit the company’s website or telephone the Pobjoy Mint at 877-476-2569. 

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