Roman coin top lot in Kunker auctions

Firm announces six sales across five days
Published : 03/10/12
Text Size


Though German auction firm Fritz Rudolph Künker’s March 12 to 16 auctions offer special collections of German King Frederick the Great as well as Swedish coins, it is an ancient Roman coin that leads all of the nearly 8,000 items to be auctioned in six sales.
The circa A.D. 266 gold aureus of Postumus, which is the plate coin (used to illustrate the type in numismatic works) for several coin references, is the highlight of the auction. The rarity is in Extremely Fine condition despite a small edge flaw, and has an estimate of €75,000 (about $98,336 in U.S. funds).
The firm begins its latest auction week, a “one-week tour through history,” as the firm explains, with more than 1,100 ancient coins in auction 204. The combined estimate for this auction is €1.2 million ($1.57 million U.S.).
Auction 205, featuring 1,000 Years of European Coinage, offers some 1,300 lots of coins, including a special collection of coins from Magdeburg. The auction covers coins issued from 500 to 1500, and has an estimate of €800,000 (about $1 million U.S.).
Auction 206 offers roughly 3,000 coins and medals from modern times, including about 100 items related to Frederick the Great, and a selection of Prussian medals from collector Johannes Zierach who died in 2011. Auction 206 has an estimate of €1.9 million (about $2.5 million U.S.).
More than 1,000 lots of gold coinage comprise auction 207, with an emphasis on gold coins of Austria, the House of Habsburg, the House of Regensburg and all German regions. This auction has an estimate of €1.4 million (about $2 million U.S.).
The third part of the Julius Hagander Collection of Sweden and its Territories comprises auction 208, its 230 lots having a combined estimate of €900,000 ($1.1 million U.S.). A highlight from this offering of the Hagander Collection is a 1633 gold 20-ducat coin of the city of Wolgast that commemorates the transfer of the deceased Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus Magnus. The piece, which is cataloged as of the “utmost rarity,” is graded Very Fine and has an estimate of €50,000 ($65,562 U.S.).
The final sale of the marathon of auctions, No. 209, offers roughly 500 lots of Russian coins and German coins since 1871, with a total estimate greater than €800,000 (about $1 million U.S.).
All lots may be viewed online and the catalogs may be downloaded at the auction house website, Bidding may also be accomplished through
All successful lots are subject to a 15 percent buyer’s fee.
For more information, email the business at or telephone it at (011) 49 541 96 20. ■
You are signed in as:null

Please sign in or join to share your thoughts on this story

No comments yet