‘Technically perfect’ 1989 American Eagle silver bullion coin tops $14,000

Market Analysis: Registery set collecting behind popularity of high-grade modern issues
By , Coin World
Published : 08/09/16
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Modern issues in top grades continue to get the attention of collectors putting together grading service Registry Sets.

However, collectors would be wise to keep an eye on grading service population reports to monitor increase of certain issues in top grades as more modern-era coins are submitted to grading services. With a limited number of buyers, addition of new examples certified in top grades can have a big impact on the price.

As the supply of these modern issues is only going to increase over time, to sustain demand more collectors will need to keep wanting these. 

Here is one of three recently sold high-grade modern issues we're profiling in this week's Market Analysis:

The Lot:

1989 American Eagle bullion, MS-70

The Price:

$14,100

The Story:

American Eagle 1-ounce silver bullion coins from 1989 are downright rare in perfect grades. In the earliest years of the American Eagle bullion program, coins weren’t sent directly to grading services as they are today. Those buyers three decades ago likely wouldn’t have predicted the demand for “perfect” examples today. Where PCGS has graded 8,753 in Mint State 69, it has awarded the MS-70 grade to this issue just seven times. At Heritage’s July summer Florida United Numismatists auction in Orlando, the firm sold a 1989 silver American Eagle graded PCGS MS-70 for a hearty $14,100.

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Heritage describes the coin as “a technically perfect example, with fully struck design elements and impeccably preserved surfaces that radiate vibrant, satiny mint luster from both sides. A few subtle hints of golden-tan toning add to the incredible eye appeal.”

What is the value of your 1989 American Eagle silver dollar? Coin Values tells you.

It is housed in a special PCGS holder signed by John Mercanti, who was the twelfth Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint until his retirement in 2010, and designer of the reverse of the coin.

Keep reading this modern rarity Market Analysis:

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