Mint lifts ordering restrictions on 2015 American $1 Coin and Currency set

Limit at five sets per household since Aug. 24 release
By , Coin World
Published : 12/01/15
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Household ordering restrictions for the 2015 American $1 Coin and Currency set were lifted effective Dec. 1 by the U.S. Mint.

Customers had been limited to a maximum limit of five sets since the set was inaugurally issued Aug. 24.

Through Nov. 30, the U.S. Mint recorded sales of 74,112 sets out of a maximum release of 90,000 sets.

The primary attraction to the numismatic product, offered at $14.95 per set, is the Enhanced Uncirculated 2015-W Native American dollar that is exclusive to the set.

The reverse design of the coin honors Mohawk ironworkers who built many of the skyscrapers in New York City. The design shows a Mohawk ironworker reaching for an I-beam that is swinging into position, against a high elevation view of the city skyline in the background. Rivets are seen on the left and right side of the design border. 

The coin’s obverse retains the Sacagawea design by sculptor Glenda Goodacre first introduced in 2000.

The Enhanced Uncirculated dollar carries the W Mint mark of the West Point Mint incuse on the edge along with the date, motto E PLURIBUS UNUM and 13 stars.

The tri-fold presentation folder housing the coin also includes one Series 2013 $1 Federal Reserve note from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The serial number on the $1 note begins with “911” in honor of the Mohawk ironworkers’ recovery efforts following the collapse of the World Trade Center Twin Towers during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The set also contains historical information about the Mohawk ironworkers and their contributions to “high iron” construction work on New York City skyscrapers, including the World Trade Center, complementing the coin's reverse design.

Packaging problems with the set resulted in a number of the sets being returned after their recipients discovered the $1 Federal Reserve note shifted outside of its intended enclosure. In some instances, the notes were either creased or stuck to the adhesive meant to secure the note inside its packaging compartment.

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