Famous CBS host featured on one of several medals included in Clark family items sold by Christie's

Valuables owned by the Clark family were sold by the New York auction house on June 18
By , Coin World
Published : 06/25/14
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Several medals, one featuring a radio host of the 1930s and ’40s, were sold this month during a Christie’s auction of items collected by a notable American family.

“An American Dynasty: The Clark Family Treasures” was an auction held by the New York auction house on June 18. Among the more than 400 "treasures" featured were fine art, musical instruments and furnishings possessed by the family of Sen. William Andrews Clark, which Christie’s describes as “one of the cornerstone dynasties of Industrial Age America.” 

"As one of the nation’s wealthiest men at the turn of the 20th century, William Andrews Clark’s name is synonymous with American aspiration,” the Christie’s website reads. "Both a senator and a magnate of a successful personal empire enveloping multiple industries, Clark’s prosperity and wide-ranging curiosity drove him to pursue a lifelong passion for art and culture that he shared with his wife and daughters."

Two lots in the auction featured medals designed by Mario Joseph Korbel. 

One lot, which realized $5,250, features a pair of 14-karat gold portrait reliefs, one portraying Margaret Illington Bowes and another portraying Edward "Major" Bowes.

Edward "Major" Bowes was a writer and composer who hosted CBS Radio’s Major Bowes’ Original Amateur Hour from 1934 to 1946, according to IMDb.

Bowes has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Radio. His IMDb profile states he was married to Margaret Illington Bowes from 1909 to 1934.

The Bowes medals are inscribed with MARIO KORBEL and TO ANNA WHOM SHE WOULD HAVE LOVED MAJOR.

The other Korbel lot included three bronze-with-gold-patina plaques that feature portraits of two of Clark’s daughters, Andreé and Huguette Clark, and his wife, Anna La Chapelle Clark. 

The lot with those three medals, each inscribed with the name of the individual portrayed, sold for $1,750.

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