Collector achieves a 'first'

First 2013 DDO cent surfaces
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Published : 05/08/13
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Every year I anticipate who will be the first to submit a doubled die with the date for the new year.

The winner for 2013 is Coin World reader Tanaka Davis. He submitted a 2013 Lincoln cent with an obverse doubled die.

Extra thickness shows on the letters of LIBERTY. Moderate extra thickness shows on the date. Additionally, strong “notches” show on the top left of the letters ERTY in LIBERTY. I now list this one in my files as 2013 1¢ WDDO-001. We already have a runner-up to share with you next month. It is nice to see that these varieties are still coming from the U.S. Mint.

Coin World readers John Amato and Bob Gittis jointly submitted a Proof 1969-S Lincoln cent with a nice doubled die reverse. A spread to the west shows on the letters of E PLURIBUS UNUM and the dots with the strongest spread on the upper left half of the reverse.

A spread toward the rim shows on the lower letters of UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the upper letters of ONE CENT with the strongest spread showing on the T in CENT.

Proof Lincoln cent dies on average strike about 3,000 coins before being retired from use, so it is highly unlikely that more than 3,000 examples of this variety exist. I have it listed in my files as 1969-S 1¢ Pr WDDR-001.

A 2002-D Lincoln cent with a significant doubled die reverse was submitted by Coin World reader Don Venson.

Strong impressions of extra columns can be found in the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth Lincoln Memorial bays. This is one of those “Where have you been hiding?” varieties. It is now listed as 2002-D 1¢ WDDR-003 in my files.

Rounding things out this month is a 1966 Kennedy half dollar from Coin World reader Bill Albright. It features strong doubling to the letters of IN GOD WE TRUST, the date, Kennedy’s profile and Kennedy’s ear.

While it isn’t a new listing in my files, it is still a very nice doubled die to find. It is listed as 1966 50¢ WDDO-002 in my files.

What have you been finding?

John Wexler is a renowned numismatic researcher and author on error coins and die varieties.

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