Double-licious!

Doubled die cents eye candy
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Published : 01/09/13
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In my Dec. 17 column, I shared four different significant reverse doubled die varieties for the 1942 Lincoln cents courtesy of Robert J. Piazza. I also promised a fifth, also submitted by Mr. Piazza, and the time has come to keep that promise.

The variety that I now list as 1942 1¢ WDDR-021 shows a Class IV spread to the north on the ON of ONE, the CE of CENT, the US of PLURIBUS, both U’s in UNUM, the N, T, E, and D of UNITED, and also on the AMER and last A in AMERICA.

Lamont Gilles submitted a 1944 Lincoln cent with an interesting doubled die obverse variety. Doubling shows on the TY in LIBERTY, the 194 in the date, and the second T in TRUST. The easiest place to spot the doubling is the bottom of the Y in LIBERTY. This doubled die variety is in my files as 1944 1¢ WDDO-017.

A 1955-D Lincoln cent with a doubled die obverse was submitted by Marvin Young. It isn’t new to my files, but it sure is a nice one. Listed in my files as 1955-D 1¢ WDDO-001, strong doubling shows on the 19 of the date, Lincoln’s eye, the lower ear and the center fold of Lincoln’s vest.

This particular doubled die variety was considered nice enough to merit listing in The Cherrypickers’ Guide to Rare Die Varieties where it was assigned the listing number of FS-01-1955D-101. The variety is also listed as 1955-D 1¢ 1-O-IV+VIII by the Combined Organizations of Numismatic Error Collectors of America, and as 1955D-1DO-001 by Coppercoins.

Topping things off for this month, James Daniels submitted a Proof 2009-S Lincoln, Formative Years cent with a very nice doubled die reverse.

Strong doubling shows on the underside of Lincoln’s left thumb on the reverse. It may not sound like much, but it is easily seen with low magnification.

Listed as 2009-S 1¢ Pr FY WDDR-006, this coin can be considered to be extremely rare. Proof cent dies strike about 3,000 coins before they are retired from use so it is highly unlikely that more than 3,000 examples of this variety exist.

John Wexler is a renowned numismatic researcher and author on error coins and die varieties.

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