Precious metals coins offer opportunities for gift-giving during holidays

Gold, silver, platinum go long way
By , Coin World
Published : 11/24/14
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The Three Wise Men honored the child Jesus with gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

What that would be worth today is anyone’s guess.

If so inclined, this Wise Man would look at gold, silver and platinum coin options combined for his closest numismatic friend for less than $600.

The ways one may find to buy bullion in coin and other forms are plentiful. I present coin options, but can also recommend straight bullion substitutes.

Two of the coin options I’d pick are United States Mint products from the West Point Mint — one can be purchased directly from the U.S. Mint, and the other requires secondary market acquisition.

For the platinum purchase, I’d choose a product struck at the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa.

Shouldn’t cost a mint

To fill my market basket, I’d start with the American Eagle 1-ounce .999 fine silver bullion coin.

At current metals prices, a single American Eagle 1-ounce silver bullion coin could be purchased from a storefront or online distributor for under $22.

Proof versions of the American Eagle coins are sold by the U.S. Mint directly to the public as numismatic products, at prices significantly higher than the precious metal each coin contains. 

For my second precious metal coin, I’d select a Proof 2014-W American Eagle tenth-ounce .9167 fine gold $5 coin. Collectors could still order the coin directly from the Mint at the existing price Nov. 20 of $170.

The price is subject to change with the spot price of the precious metal according to the U.S. Mint’s pricing grid for coins containing precious metals.

The final gift is a Canadian Maple Leaf twentieth-ounce .9995 fine platinum coin struck at the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa.

APMEX.com recently offered the twentieth-ounce platinum Maple Leaf for close to $135 per coin. Bumping up that size to a tenth-ounce platinum Maple Leaf of a random date would push the price to just under the $300 per coin mark.

“Random dates” often means the selection is the seller’s choice based on available inventory.

If you’re looking for gold, silver and platinum bullion in options other than coins, various manufacturers make pieces in sizes as low as 1-gram wafers up to kilo bars.

The larger the weight of the item purchased, the lower the price per troy ounce for the precious metal the item contains.

Similarly, the price per bullion coin for American Eagle, Canadian Maple Leaf and similar issues from other government mints differs depending on whether you are buying a single coin, a 20-coin tube, or a box of 500 coins, with the price per coin dropping as the quantity increases.

The price may also be lower depending on your method of payment. 

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