Insights

Mint sales of American Eagle silver bullion coins to authorized purchasers heading toward another record

2014 sales reach 21.01 million coins through May 20
By Paul Gilkes , Coin World
Published : 05/21/14
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Sales by the United States Mint of American Eagle silver bullion coins are well on their way toward setting a record.

With just five months gone in calendar year 2014, sales through May 20 already reached 21.01 million coins.

Sales during the record calendar year of 2013 reached 42,675,000 coins.

The 2014 American Eagle silver bullion coins went on sale to its authorized purchasers Jan. 13.

March is the strongest sales month thus far during 2014, with 5,354,000 coins recorded sold.

The highest single monthly sales total for the American Eagle 1-ounce silver bullion coins since they were first offered in November 1986 was established in January 2013, when the count reached 7,498,000 pieces.

That total eclipsed the previous sales record of 6,422,000 American Eagle silver bullion coins set in January 2011. 

Production of the American Eagle 1-ounce .999 fine silver bullion coins is divided between the West Point and San Francisco Mints, with the West Point facility executing 80 percent of the total output and the San Francisco Mint the remainder.

The San Francisco Mint began augmenting the West Point Mint production during the spring of 2011 after more than 10 years of the West Point facility handling all bullion coin output.

The silver American Eagles are struck without the Mint mark of either production facility. The only way to know for sure which facility struck a particular date coin is by way of its original Mint packaging — the 500-coin green “monster boxes” bear a strap marked with the Mint of origin.

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1 comment
Over 20 million Silver Eagles sold in less than 3 months, yet a 'Citizens' Advisory Committee' recommends changing the design of the eagle on the reverse. Really? Talk about change for the sake of change! Oh well, certainly sounds like something the U.S. government, coin dealers and grading companies would like to see. The Advisory Committee stated that the coin's reverse is "stodgy". In that case, let's change the design of the American flag. After 200+ years, it may be getting a bit 'stodgy' too. Both changes probably be accomplished with just a couple more (in an endless stream of) 'Executive Orders'. Disgusted citizen